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Preliminary Premium Rates for 2010
Friday, July 31, 2009 at 2:03:28 PM

July 27, 2009
Preliminary Premium Rates for 2010

Dear Stakeholder:

I am writing to you today to inform you that the WSIB Board of Directors has set the 2010 Preliminary Premium Rates for Schedule 1 employers.

The costs of running Ontario’s workplace safety and insurance system have been impacted by recent increases to benefits, by poor investment returns, and by the current global financial crisis. We have had to take decisive action to maintain the financial sustainability of the system, while being fair to the workers and employers who rely on it.

For 2010, the WSIB intends to use the same method for setting premium rates as has been used in previous years – but with one important change. Premium rates will be frozen for rate groups with good health-and-safety performance, while rate increases for poor-performing rate groups will be calculated in the usual way. Therefore, in 2010, the majority (85% or over 200,000) of employers will have their premium rates maintained at 2009 levels.

Industry accountability for workplace insurance costs remains key to the WSIB’s approach to rate-setting. Therefore, the small number of employers (approx. 36,000) that are in rate groups that place the greatest financial burden on the system (due to fatalities, injuries and illnesses in their workplaces) will have premium rate increases for 2010. These increases will be calculated using the same proportional approach – looking at claims costs and injury frequency – that has been followed in previous years.

The WSIB is freezing rates for the good performing rate groups – the employers that invest in safety, keep their injury rates down, and keep their claim durations short – so that they will not have to deal with additional costs during these tough times while the economy recovers. Employers will continue to be eligible for rebates under the WSIB’s incentive-based programs.

Now more than ever, it is important to reward good health and safety performance and ensure that poor performers pay their share and cover their costs to the system.

The WSIB will post detailed information about the 2010 preliminary premium rates – including details of rate group rate increases for employers with poor health and safety records – on the WSIB website. The WSIB is releasing preliminary rates as early as possible to assist employers with their financial forecasting and budgeting for next year. Approval of the final premium rates for 2010 is expected to take place at the WSIB Board of Directors’ meeting in September.

The WSIB maximum insurable earnings ceiling for 2010 is $77,600. This is an increase of 4 per cent from $74,600 in 2009. Changes to the Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling are directly linked to changes in average earnings in Ontario as measured by Statistics Canada, and provisions under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act.

The WSIB remains committed to its Road to Zero and the elimination of workplace injuries and their illnesses. Investing in safety saves lives, and spares workers and their families the often devastating financial and emotional effects of workplace injuries.

We are doing all we can in these difficult economic times to avoid placing undue financial burdens on employers. At the same time, we give fair warning that if the WSIB’s economic situation does not improve, we will have to consider introducing premium rate increases in the future.

If you have any questions or comments regarding the 2010 preliminary rates, please contact Brian Buchan, Assistant Director, Communications and Public Affairs, at 416-344-5062.

Yours sincerely,

Hon. Steve Mahoney, P.C.
Chair

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2010 Preliminary WSIB Premium Rates Q&A

This document has been prepared to provide additional information about the 2010 preliminary WSIB premium rates.

1.1 How is Ontario’s workplace safety and insurance board funded?

All the costs of providing workplace safety and insurance benefits and services to Ontario workplaces are paid for by Ontario employers. Ontario’s workplace safety and insurance system is based on the principle of collective liability, which means that employers who work in similar kinds of industries (with similar kinds of hazards) should be “collectively liable” for the costs of injuries in their industry.

Collective liability means that employers in, for example, the mining industry all pay their fair share of the costs of injuries in mining industry workplaces, while employers in the construction industry share the collective cost of injuries in their workplaces, and so on. (Employers covered under Schedule 2 of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, such as airlines, shipping companies and railways, are the exceptions – they pay individually for the full costs of benefits for their injured workers.)

1.2 How does the WSIB determine workplace insurance costs in various industries, and how does it determine the premium rates that individual employers in those industries are asked to pay?

The first step is to classify employers based on the nature of their business. This is done by assigning employers to “rate groups.”

There are 154 rate groups, covering everything from Meat and Fish Products to Aircraft Manufacturing. Employers in a rate group are given a premium rate, which is the amount they are asked to pay for every $100 of their workers’ insurable earnings. This rate is calculated every year based primarily on two things:
• The cost of claims for benefits due to workplace injuries and illnesses; and
• The frequency of injuries and illnesses.

Other factors also come into play, but claims costs and injury/illness frequency are the tow key drivers. These factors determine the amount the WSIB collects in premiums. In theory, this amount should be enough to cover all costs associated with claims allowed during that year for the full life of those claims, as well as the costs of administering the workplace safety and insurance system.


1.3 How has the WIB set preliminary WSIB premium rates for 2010?

For 2010 we intend to use the same method for setting premium rates as has been used in previous years – but with one important change. We are freezing premium rates for rate groups with good health-and-safety performance, while calculating rate increases for poor-performing rate groups in the usual way.

Therefore, in 2010 the larger majority of employers (over 200,000) will have their rates frozen. They will not have to deal with additional costs during these tough times while the economy recovers.

The WSIB is freezing rates for the good performers – the employers in rate groups that invest in safety, keep their injury rates down, and keep their claim durations short. Employers will be eligible for additional rebates under the WSIB’s incentive-based experience rating programs.

The read burden is rightly on the poor performers, who must take responsibility for significant cost pressures on the workplace safety and insurance system. Now more than ever it is important to reward good health and safety performance and ensure that poor performers pay their share and cover their costs to the system.

Industry accountability for workplace insurance costs remains key to the WSIB’s approach to rate-setting. Therefore, the small number of employers (approx. 36,000) in rate groups that are placing the greatest financial burden on the system (due to fatalities, injuries and illnesses in their workplaces) will have premium rate increase for 2010. These increases will be calculated using the same proportional approach – looking at claims costs and injury frequency – that has been followed in previous years.

We are doing all we can in these difficult economic times to avoid placing undue financial burdens on employers. At the same time, we give fair warning that if the WSIB’s economic situation does not improve, we will have no choice but to introduce more significant premium rate increases for employers in the future.

1.4 Why has the WSIB changed the way it sets premium rates for 2010?

The costs of running Ontario’s workplace safety and insurance system have been impacted by recent increases to benefits, by poor investment returns and by the current global financial crisis. We must take decisive action to maintain the financial sustainability of the system, while being fair to the workers and employers who rely on it.

1.5 My company has an excellent health and safety record, but my rate group premium rate is increasing. Why am I being penalized? Why are companies that have made health and safety improvements not being benefited from their hard work?

WSIB premium rates are set based on the claims experience of all employers in a rate group. This means that employers share the costs of the claims for that rate group. Your premium rates are based on those costs, as well as the frequency of claims in your rate group.

If your company’s health and safety performance has been good or better than the rate group average, you may become eligible for performance rebates under the WSIB’s incentive-based experience rating programs. The WSIB is moving ahead to re-design and improve these programs.

Employers with good health and safety programs can benefit from working with their health and safety association, and the other partners in Ontario’s health and safety system, to actively promote their successful programs among other workplaces in their rate group.

Employers will still benefit from improvements in health and safety in their workplaces, and this will help to minimize the possibility of future premium rate increases.

1.6 What was the WSIB’s unfunded liability at the end of 2008, and does the WSIB still intend to eliminate the unfunded liability in 2014?

The WSIB has not been isolated from the global economic situation. Like many large investors, its balance sheet for 2008 shows the effects of the economic downturn. Between end-of-year 2007 and 2008, the WSIB’s unfunded liability (UFL) increased from $8.1 billion to $11.5 billion.

The WSIB’s increased UFL is due in large part to disappointing investment returns – which are no different than those being experienced in world markets. The WSIB’s investment strategy allowed it to have better returns than many other Canadian pension funds. While disappointing, the WSIB’s investment performance for the year (-15.5 per cent) still outperformed the median return for large Canadian pension funds (which were in the range of -16.0 per cent to -18.0 per cent).

The market downturn means that the WSIB will not be able to achieve its original target of 2014 for full funding of the workplace safety and insurance system, i.e., the elimination of the UFL. The UFL is about projected future costs of claims already in the system that can extend 30 to 40 years down the road. The WSIB does remain committed to eliminating the UFL incrementally.

1.7 What is the WSIB doing to reduce administrative costs to the system?

Administrative and other expenses are a small portion of the total costs of the workplace safety and insurance system.

WSIB administration costs – 13% of revenue – compare favourably with the average of 19% for Canadian workers’ compensation boards. The WSIB’s administrative budget represents less than 11% of the total costs of the system. Ontario also has the third lowest administrative cost per $100 of assessable payroll when compared to other Canadian jurisdictions.

Since 2004, the WSIB has committed to hold the line on administrative expenses within its control. Controllable administrative expense targets were frozen from 2005 to 2007 and held to minimal CPI increases for 2008 and 2009. For the four-year period 2005 to 2008, the WSIB outperformed these targets by a total of $45 million dollars.

In addition, in 2004, a program of strategic sourcing was initiated to improve pricing and service performance for goods and services provided to the WSIB. This has identified nearly $20 million to date in ongoing annual cost savings.

The WSIB has launched a wide-ranging Efficiency Review. Included in the review is adherence to the Government of Ontario guidelines and reducing salary increments for senior management to 1.5%. The WSIB has also increased oversight on all staffing and discretionary expenditures.

Efficiency efforts in 2008 alone resulted in savings of $10 million from administration expenses.

The WSIB is doing a good job at keeping costs down, but we are still determined to do better by looking at a number of options for reducing health care costs without impacting health care services to injured and ill workers.

Historically, the WSIB has been a passive payer of health care bills but, with spending on health care topping $600 million this year, we are becoming a more active purchaser of health care services. We are collaborating with a network of health professionals to ensure workers are getting the right care at the right time while looking at health care costs in other jurisdictions to make sure that we’re paying the appropriate market rate for services like MRIs.

The WSIB has also created a Drug Advisory Committee – a blue ribbon panel of external experts – to provide recommendations on how best to manage the WSIB’s drug benefit program. There has been an upward trend in the prescription of narcotics for injured workers over the last 15 years. The WSIB has launched a pilot project to review those prescriptions and ensure that any narcotic therapy will improve a worker’s quality of life, ability to function, and support a safe and sustained return to work.

1.8 Why have premium rates increased for some rate groups?

2010 rates are frozen for the majority of employers, but employers in rate groups with poor health and safety records will experience rate increases in 2010.

New premium rates for poor performing rate groups have been calculated: 19 per cent of these firms will have a rate increase of more than 5% in 2010. The remaining 81 per cent will have a rate increase of less than 5%. (This does not take into account the effects of incentive programs.)

Premium rate increases and decreases for poor-performing rate groups are linked to higher injury frequency and/or average costs per claim.

1.9 The WSIB is facing significant financial pressures. Why weren’t all employers subject to the usual premium rate setting methodology?

For 2010, the WSIB is making industry more directly accountable for workplace insurance costs. This means that the majority of employers – over 200,000 firms – will have their rates frozen so they won’t have to deal with additional costs as our economy recovers.

Employers are also eligible for rebates – particularly as the WSIB moves ahead with the redesign of its incentive-based experience rating programs.

Under the new programs that will be introduced, incentives will be based on more than just injury rates and costs. They will take real health and safety practices and outcomes into consideration.

The real burden is rightly on the poor performers, who must take responsibility for significant cost pressures on the workplace safety and insurance system. Now more than ever it is important to reward good health and safety performance and ensure that poor performers pay their share and cover their costs to the system.

1.10 Does this mean that future premium rates will be larger to make up for the break that is being given to good performers for 2010? Will there be larger increases for all employers in 2011?

We are doing all we can in these difficult economic times to avoid placing undue financial burdens on employers. At the same time, we give fair warning that if the WSIB’s economic situation does not improve, we will have to consider introducing premium rate increases in the future.

1.11 What will the WSIB be doing to communicate with employers about their 2010 premium rates?

Information sessions for stakeholders are being scheduled for August, at which time technical financial information will be provided. As well, employers receiving large increases will be contacted directly by WSIB Employer Service Centre representatives. Follow-up will be provided by Disability Prevention Specialists.

1.12 Why have some poor-performing rate group premium rates increased more than others?

Each rate group’s premium rate is influenced by its own performance with respect to claims cost and injury frequency rates.

1.13 What is the WSIB doing to address the financial pressures that are facing the workplace health and safety system?

The WSIB is committed to maintaining a disciplined approach to managing the risks and uncertainties that may result from financial pressures on the workplace safety and insurance system.

The WSIB’s Funding Framework is aligned with the WSIB’s Five Year Strategic Plan 2008 – 2012, The Road to Zero. The Road to Zero sets the WSIB’s goals for the system, and confirms the WSIB’s ongoing commitment to the elimination of all workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities; quality and timely health care; fair and equitable compensation; and early, safe and sustainable return to work. It also promotes business excellence through improvements in effectiveness and efficiency and strengthened financial stewardship for the future.

1.14 When were preliminary premium rates made available to employers?

The WSIB released the preliminary premium rates for 2010 to the public in July 2009. Preliminary premium rates for individual rate groups were posted on the WSIB’s website at www.wsib.on.ca at that time.

Ontario employers with current WSIB accounts will receive a note with their Statements of Account and Premium Remittance Forms informing them that preliminary premium rates for 2010 are available.

1.15 What are premium rates for poor-performing employer rate groups made up of?

WSIB premium rates for poor-performing employer rate groups are made up of three key components:
1. Costs of new injuries and illnesses
2. Administrative costs, including legislated obligations (Occupational Health and Safety Act, etc)
3. Unfunded liability amortization charge

Details of the components of that make up premium rates and an explanation of how they are calculated can be obtained from the Premium Rate Manual, available on the WSIB website.

Note that, for 2010, premium rates for rate groups not designated “poor performing” are frozen.

1.16 What can I do to minimize increases to the premium rate of my rate group?

Work to make your workplace safer and develop an early and safe return-to-work program. Also, share your workplace health and safety knowledge and experience with other members of your rate group.

Collaborative, aligned, and effective partnerships are vital to promoting prevention and better health care and return to work outcomes. Reaching and surpassing the goals set out in the WSIB’s Five Year Strategic Plan 2008-2012, The Road to Zero, will ultimately result in the reduction of the unfunded liability (UFL) and more stable and predictable premium rates for employers.

Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committees (required in all workplaces that have more than 20 employees) can help you to identify areas where health and safety improvements are required. Ontario has a health and safety association (HSA) dedicated to serving employers in your industry. If you aren’t already working with your HSA to improve health and safety in your workplace, you should visit the WSIB website or contact your WSIB Employer Service Representative for more information about your HSA. Employer Service Representatives for rate groups with 5 per cent or greater increases will be referring employers for follow-up assistance to a WSIB Disability Prevention Specialist.

Compliance is another important factor. If you suspect that a business in your rate group is getting an unfair financial advantage by not registering with the WSIB, not reporting injuries or illnesses, or not paying premiums, contact our anonymous Action Line at 1-888-745-3237 or email sileads@wsib.on.ca .
1.17 Does the WSIB offer programs to improve workplace health and safety?

The WSIB is in the business of promoting the prevention of workplace injuries and illness. We work in partnership with the Ministry of Labour and the Health and Safety Associations (HSAs).

Each HSA offers occupational health and safety programs, training and resources targeted to employers by industry sector. To find out more about the HSA that serves your industry sector, find its website at our WSIB partners page on the WSIB website, or call 1-800-663-6639 or 416-344-1016.

1.18 Special Information for small business employers

If you are in the WSIB’s Merit Adjusted Premium plan (MAP), your 2010 rate group premium rate may be adjusted based on your individual accident record.

1.19 What is the Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling, and why does it change every year?

The WSIB maximum insurable earnings ceiling for 2010 is $77,600. This is an increase of 4 per cent from $74,600 in 2009.

Changes to the Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling are directly linked to changes in average earnings in Ontario as measured by Statistics Canada, and provisions under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act.

Changes to the Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling can result in an increase to the premiums employers pay (to the extent that they have employees who earn more than the maximum of $77,600).

Under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, a worker’s average earnings for workplace insurance purposes cannot exceed 175 per cent of the Ontario average industrial wage for each year. The legislation requires the WSIB to calculate this yearly “Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling” based on the most recent published Ontario average industrial wage on July 1 of the preceding year.

The WSIB has calculated the preliminary 2010 Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling based on the preliminary average weekly earnings aggregate, which was published by Statistics Canada in June 2009.

The WSIB uses a standard formula to calculate the Maximum Insurable Earnings Ceiling:

$([preliminary average weekly earnings aggregate] x 365)/7 x 1.75

(The result is rounded to the nearest hundred dollars.)

1.20 What are some of the things an employer can do to improve workplace health and safety and reduce workplace injuries and costs?

There are a number of things that an employer can do to reduce workplace injuries and costs. For example, you can:

• Conduct regular inspections and assess hazards to determine if they may cause injuries or illnesses. Hazards should be removed, or controls should be put in place to protect workers from them. You should inform your workers about hazards and tell them how they can work safely.

• Train your employees about their health and safety responsibilities so they know how to contribute to hazard controls.

• Provide health and safety orientation training for every new employee. Training should include job training and hazard control training.

• Create a joint health and safety committee (a must-do if you have 20 or more employees). This committee must have at least one worker and one management certified member. You must also provide the committee with the resources it needs to fulfill its role in the workplace.

• Develop a return-to-work program to help workers get back to work safely after an injury or illness. Preventing workplace injuries and illness is the responsibility of everyone in the workplace. If an injury and illness does occur, it is important for you and your employee to minimize the human and financial impacts by working to achieve a return to safe and productive work as soon as medically possible.

• Address musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and falls, which account for about 60 per cent of all lost time claims. Resources to help you address these and other hazards can be downloaded from the WSIB website, and from the new prevent-it.ca website. If you are not sure where to begin, you can download a booklet, Getting Started on Prevention, from prevent-it.ca.

• Work together with the WSIB to improve your workplace safety and return-to-work programs. A wide range of information, incentives and initiatives is available to Ontario employers who want to increase efficiency and save money by improving their workplace programs.

• Contact your health and safety association for assistance.

1.21 How can I work with the WSIB and the other partners in Ontario’s workplace health and safety system to lower injuries and costs in my rate group?

• If your injuries and costs are better than average, be a leader by helping others in your rate group. Play an active part in recruiting other firms in your rate group into the WSIB’s Safety Groups program and the Safe Communities Incentive Program (SCIP). These programs are voluntary, and help members create safer and healthier workplaces. They are there to help you help yourself.

• If your injuries and claims costs are higher than average, you can work with the better-performing firms in your rate group to improve your performance.

• Find out about programs that help make your workplace safer by going to the WSIB website at www.wsib.on.ca and clicking on Prevention to see the range of prevention programs available.

• You can also get help by contacting your health and safety association and by contacting the WSIB hotline at 1-800-663-6639.


Heat Stress Requirements for Safety in the Workplace
Friday, July 03, 2009 at 2:32:45 PM

Introduction to the Legal Requirements:

Employers have a duty under section 25(2)(h) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act to take every precaution reasonable in the circumstances for the protection of the worker. This includes developing hot environment policies and procedures to protect workers in hot environments due to hot processes or hot weather. For compliance purposes, the ministry of Labour recommends the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) for Heat Stress and Heat Strain published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). These values are based on preventing unacclimatized workers’ core temperatures from rising above 38C.


This Guideline is intended to assist employers, workers and other workplace parties in understanding heat stress, and in developing and implementing policies to prevent heat-related illness in the workplace.


What is Heat Stress?

Working or playing where it is hot puts stress on your body’s cooling system. When heat is combined with other stresses such as hard physical work, loss of fluids, fatigue or some medical conditions, it may lead to heat-related illness, disability and even death.

This can happen to anybody – even the young and fit. In Ontario, heat stress is usually a concern during the summer. This is especially true early in the season, when people are not used to the heat.

Heat exposure may occur in many workplaces. Furnaces, bakeries, smelters, foundries and heavy equipment are significant sources of heat inside workplaces. For outdoor workers, direct sunlight is the main source of heat. In mines, geothermal gradients and equipment contribute to heat exposure. Humidity in workplaces also contributes to heat stress.


How We Cope With Heat

Your body is always generating heat and passing it to the environment. The harder your body is working, the more heat it has to lose. When the environment is hot or humid or has a source of radiant heat (for example, a furnace or the sun), your body must work harder to get rid of its heat.

If the air is moving (for example, from fans), and it is cooler than your body, it is easier for your body to pass heat to the environment.

Workers on medications or with pre-existing medial conditions may be more susceptible to heat stress. These workers should speak to their personal physicians about work in hot environments.


Controlling Heat Stress - Acclimatization

The longer you work hard in the heat, the better your body becomes at adjusting to the heat. If you are not used to working in the heat then you should take a week or two to get used to the heat. This is called “acclimatization.” If you are ill or away from work for a week or so you can lose your acclimatization.

There are two ways to acclimatize:

1. If you are experienced on the job, limit your time in hot working conditions to 50 per cent of the shift on the first day, 60 per cent of the shift on the second day, and 80 per cent of the shift on the third day. You can work a full shift the fourth day.

If you are not experienced on the job (if you are, for example, a summer student), you should start off spending 20 per cent of the time in hot working conditions on the first day and increase your time by 20 per cent each subsequent day.

2. Instead of reducing the exposure times to the hot job, you can become acclimatized by reducing the physical demands of the job for a week or two.

If you have health problems or are not in good physical condition, you may need longer periods of acclimatization. Hot spells in Ontario seldom last long enough to allow acclimatization. However, exposure to workplace heat sources may permit acclimatization.


Modifying Work and the Environment

Heat exposures may be reduced by several methods. Selection of appropriate workplace controls will vary, depending on the type of workplace and other factors. Some measures may include:

Engineering Controls

• Control the heat at its source through the use of insulating
and reflective barriers (e.g. insulate furnace walls).
• Exhaust hot air and steam produced by operations.
• Reduce the temperature and humidity through air cooling.
• Provide air-conditioned rest areas.
• Provide cool work areas.
• Increase air movement if temperature is less than 35C (fans).
• Reduce physical demands of work task through mechanical
assistance (hoists, lift-tables, etc.).

Administrative Controls

• The employer should assess the demands of all jobs and have
monitoring and control strategies in place for hot days and
hot workplaces.
• Increase the frequency and length of rest breaks.
• Schedule strenuous jobs to cooler times of the day.
• Provide cool drinking water near workers and remind them to
drink a cup every 20 minutes or so.
• Caution workers to avoid direct sunlight.
• Assign additional workers or slow down the pace of work.
• Make sure everyone is properly acclimatized.
• Train workers to recognize the signs and symptoms of heat
stress and start a “buddy system” since people are not
likely to notice their own symptoms.
• Pregnant workers and workers with a medical condition should
discuss working in the heat with their doctor.
• First Aid responders and an emergency response plan should
be in place in the even tof a heat-related illness.
• Investigate any heat-related incidents.


Personal Protective Equipment

• Light summer clothing should be worn to allow free air
movement and sweat evaporation.
• Outside, wear light-coloured clothing.
• In a high radiant heat situation, reflective clothing may
help.
• For very hot environments, air, water or ice-cooled
insulated clothing should be considered.
• Vapour barrier clothing, such as chemical protective
clothing, greatly increases the amount of heat stress on the
body, and extra caution is necessary.

Managing Heat Stress from Process Heat

For an environment that is hot primarily due to process heat (furnaces, bakeries, smelters, etc.), the employer should follow the guidance of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) as outlined in its booklet and documentation for the recommended Threshold Limit Values (TLVs), and set up a heat stress control plan in consultation with the workplace’s joint health and safety committee or worker health and safety representative.

Further information on the ACGIH TLVs, and on the development of heat stress control plans, may be found at the following websites:

ACGIH
http://www.acgih.org/home.htm

U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OHSA)
http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_iii/otm_iii_4.html


Managing Heat Stress Induced by Hot Weather

Most workplaces don’t have “hot processes” but working in hot weather can pose health risks to their workers. For hot work environments due to hot weather, a hot weather plan is appropriate. A hot weather plan is a simplified heat stress control plan. A hot weather plan should establish the implementation criteria, or “triggers,” to put the plan into effect. The criteria may include:

Weather/environmental indicator triggers such as:

• Humidex reaching or exceeding 35 degrees Celsius
• Environment Canada Humidex advisory (air temperature
exceeding 30 degrees Celsius and Humidex exceeding 40
degrees Celsius) or Ontario Ministry of the Environment smog
alert;
• Environment Canada weather reports; and/or
• Heat waves (three or more days of temperatures of 32 degrees
Celsius or more)

Generally, plans related to hot weather should be in place between May 1 and September 30 of each year.

Note: Remember that while complying with occupational health and safety laws, you are also required to comply with applicable environmental laws.