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Below you will find a listing of up to date news covering the US, Canada, and Ireland.

 
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Current News | News Page 2 | News Page 3 | News Page 4

July 23, 2007

Are your lifting devices in good condition to lift?

Every year, inadequate inspections and maintenance of lifting devices lead to critical and fatal injuries at work.

Getting started - How does your workplace stack up?

  • Are procedures in place for the initial and regular inspection and servicing?
  • Do operators conduct pre-use checks prior to daily operation?
  • Are written job procedures available to, understood, and followed by workers?
  • Does a 'competent' person inspect, repair and maintain lifting devices?
  • Is lifting equipment used properly by a trained and 'competent' person?
  • Are supervisors trained and 'competent' regarding lifting devices?
  • Are incidents and injuries investigated to find and eliminate the root causes?

If you are unsure or answer NO to any of the above questions, GET HELP.


July 17, 2007

MACHINES & PEOPLE Can be a deadly mix!

One in four workplace deaths involves machines.
Over 7,500 workers are injured using machines every year.

GETTING STARTED - HOW DOES YOUR WORKPLACE STACK UP?

  • Is guarding in place and used properly?
  • Is machinery in good repair and used properly?
  • Are lock out procedures clear and understandable?
  • Are workers and supervisors trained before work starts on machines?
  • Are written job procedures available to, understood and followed by workers?
  • Is required personal protective equipment in good repair and used properly?
  • Are incidents and injuries investigated to find and eliminate the root cause?
  • If you are unsure or answer NO to any of the above questions, GET HELP.

July 13, 2007

You may be struck by these facts!

Over 7,000 workers are struck and injured by objects every year.
Being struck by objects is the second most frequent cause of on-the-job injury.

Getting started - how does your workplace stack up?

  • Is shielding and/or barriers in place and used properly?
  • Are adequate storage facilities provided and are materials secured from falling?
  • Are good housekeeping standards set and followed?
  • Are workers trained before they' re on the job?
  • Are written job procedures available to, understood, and followed by workers?
  • Is required personal protective equipment in good repair and used properly?
  • Are incidents and injuries investigated to find and eliminate the root cause?

If you are unsure or answer NO to any of the above questions, GET HELP.


July 12, 2007

Pedestrians & mobile equipment
don' t mix!

Each year, almost 900 workers are seriously injured by mobile equipment. 
On average, every injury results in 29 lost workdays.

Getting Started - How does your workplace stack up?

  •  Is mobile equipment in good condition and used properly?
  •  Are separate routes for pedestrians and mobile equipment provided and clearly marked?
  •  Are protective barriers, warnings signs and other safeguards in place and in good repair?
  •  Is adequate space provided to safely turn around and back up?
  •  Are speed limits for mobile equipment set, posted and enforced?
  •  Are written job procedures available to, understood and followed by workers?
  •  Are drivers/operators, signalers and supervisors trained and  competent?
  •  Are other workers trained on how to work safely around mobile equipment?
  •  Is unattended mobile equipment secured against movement?
  •  Are incidents and injuries investigated to find and eliminate the root cause?

If you are unsure or answer NO to any of the above questions, GET HELP.

Do you know your legal obligations?

Not complying with the law can result in injuries, illnesses and death as well as:

  • Compliance and stop work orders
  • Prosecutions
  • Fines
  • Imprisonment

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Preventing Asthma and Death from Diisocyanate Exposure
Click here for more information


Ideas for Preventing Heat Stress Alert
Heat stress can happen to us all

Hot temperatures combined with factors such as high humidity, hard physical work, loss of body fluids, fatigue or some medical conditions can put stress on the body' s cooling system. When this happens it can lead to a heat related illness or disability or even death.

Who' s at risk?

Heat stress can happen to anybody, even the young and fit, and heat exposure may occur in all kinds of workplaces. Industrial furnaces, bakeries, smelters, foundries and worksites with heavy equipment are significant sources of heat inside workplaces. For outdoor workers, direct sunlight is the main source of heat. In mines, geothermal gradients and equipment can contribute to exposure.

Controlling Heat Stress

  • Acclimatization - You should take a week or two to get used to the heat and allow your body to adjust. This is called  acclimatization . Be aware that if you are away from work for a week you may need to re-adjust to the heat.
  • Engineering Controls - Air-cooling systems, fans and insulating and reflective barriers around furnaces and machinery can help to reduce heat exposure and control workplace temperatures and humidity. 
  • Administrative Controls - Ensure that there are appropriate monitoring and control strategies in place and be ready to take appropriate action for hot days and hot workplaces. To prevent heat stress, increase the frequency and the length of rest breaks and slow down the pace of work.
  • Work and rest schedules are not always an effective strategy to lower body temperatures.
  • When ambient temperatures exceed about 30o C other strategies should be incorporated with work rest scheduling.
  • Active cooling strategies such as air conditioned environments, access to fans and misters and specific actions like forearm submersion may effectively reduce heat stress during rest periods when the protective clothing can be removed.
  • Fluid replacement strategies can reduce the risk of heat stress.
  • Effective fluid replacement and active cooling strategies during rest Increase theĜperiods can help reduce the risk of heat stress to the worker. number of breaks

DON' T UNDERESTIMATE THE HAZARDS OF HEAT STRESS. When it' s hot you need to drink a lot of fluids, dress appropriately and recognize the signs of heat stress. If heat exposure is an issue in your workplace you need to develop and implement policies to prevent heat-related illnesses.

 
 
 
 

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